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Roy


 

Scott C. Williams, Ph. D.

Reserach Scientist- Adjunct 

Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation Center

 

Department of Natural Resources & the Environment

University of Connecticut

1376 Storrs Rd. Unit 4087

Storrs, CT 06269-4087

 

Phone: 203-974-8609

Scott.Williams@ct.gov

 

Research Interests

Currently working on linking forest health with public health in terms of invasive plants and associated blacklegged ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Researching low-toxicity integrated tick management strategies that include targeting ticks directly as well as pathogen reservoir hosts (white-footed mice) and major reproductive hosts (white-tailed deer).

 


Education

CWB 2010

Certified Wildlife Biologist, The Wildlife Society

Ph. D. 2008

University of Connecticut; Natural Resources

M.E.S 2000

Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

B.A. 1997 Connecticut College; Environmental Studies

Experience

2014 - Present Associate Agricultural Scientist, Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
2008-2014

Assistant Agricultural Scientist II, Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

2003-2008 Agricultural Research Technician I, Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
2001-2003 Agricultural Research Assistant III, Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
2000-2001 Agricultural Research Assistant II, Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

 


Selected Publications

  • Linske, M. A., S. C. Williams, J. S. Ward, and K. C. Stafford III. 2018. Indirect effects of Berberis thunbergii infestations on Peromyscus leucopus exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi. Environmental Entomology. In Review.
  • Williams, S. C., E. A. H. Little, K. C. Stafford III, G. Molaei, and M. A. Linske. 2018.Integrated control of juvenile Ixodes scapularis parasitizing Peromyscus leucopus in residential southwestern Connecticut. Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases. In Review.
  • Ward, J. S. and S. C. Williams. 2018. Effect of tree diameter, canopy position, age, andbrowsing on stump sprouting in southern New England. Forest Science. In Press.
  • Linske, M. A., S. C. Williams, K. C. Stafford III, and Isaac M. Ortega. 2018. Ixodes scapularis reservoir host diversity and abundance impacts on dilution of Borrelia burgdorferi in residential and woodland habitats in Connecticut, USA. Journal of Medical Entomology. In Press.
  • Ward, J. S., S. C. Williams, and M. A. Linske. 2017. Influence of invasive shrubs and deer browsing on regeneration in temperate deciduous forests. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48(1): 58-67.
  • Williams, S. C., K. C. Stafford, III, G. Molaei, and M. A. Linske. 2017. Integrated control of nymphal Ixodes scapularis: Effectiveness of white-tailed deer reduction, the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, and fipronil-based rodent bait boxes. Vector-Borne and Zoootic Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2017.2146.
  • Stafford, K. C. III, S. C. Williams, and G. Molaei. 2017. Integrated pest management in controlling ticks and tick-associated diseases. Journal of Integrated Pest Management 8(1): 28; 1-7.
  • Williams, S. C., M. A. Linske, and J. S. Ward. 2017. Long-term effects of Berberis thunbergii management on Ixodes scapularis abundance and Borrelia burgdorferi prevalence in Connecticut, USA. Environmental Entomology 46: 1329-1338.
  • Stafford III, K. C., and S. C. Williams. 2017. Deer-targeted methods: A review of the use of topical acaricides for the control of ticks on white-tailed deer. Journal of Integrated Pest Management 8: 1-5.
  • Cornillot, E., A. Dassouli, N. Pachikara, L. Lawres, I. Renard, C. Francois, S. Randazzo, V. Brès, A. Garg, J. Brancato, J.E. Pazzi, J. Pablo, C. Hung, A. Teng, A.D. Shandling, V. T.
  • Huynh, P.J. Krause, T. Lepore, S. Delbecq, G. Hermanson, X. Liang, S. C. Williams, D. M. Molina, and C. Ben Mamoun. 2016. A targeted immunomic approach identifies diagnostic antigens in the human pathogen Babesia microti. Transfusion: 56: 2085-2099.
  • Ward, J. S., S. C. Williams, and M. A. Linske. 2017. Independent effects of invasive shrubs and deer herbivory on plant community dynamics. Forests 8(2) 1-18.
  • Williams, S. C. and M. A. Gregonis. 2015. Survival and movement of rehabilitated white-tailed deer fawns in Connecticut. Wildlife Society Bulletin 39:664-669.
  • Williams, S. C. and M. R. Short. 2014. Evaluation of eight repellents in deterring eastern cottontail herbivory in Connecticut. Human-Wildlife Interactions 8:113-122.
  • Yan, J., Y. Chen, K. Lawrence-Apfel, I. Ortega, V. Pozdnyakov, S. C. Williams, and T. Meyer. 2014. A moving-resting process with an embedded Brownian motion for animal movements. Population Ecology 56:401-415.
  • Stafford, K. C., III, S. C. Williams, L. A. Magnarelli, A. Bharadwaj, S. H. Eretl, and R. S. Nelson. 2014. Expansion of zoonotic babesiosis and reported human cases, Connecticut, 2001-2010. Journal of Medical Entomology 51:245-252.
  • Ward, J. S., S. C. Williams, and T. E. Worthley. 2013. Comparing effectiveness and impacts of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) control treatments and herbivory on plant communities. Invasive Plant Science and Management 6:459-469.
  • Magnarelli, L. A., S. C. Williams, S. J. Norris, and E. Fikrig. 2013. Serum antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti in recaptured white- footed mice. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 49:294-302.
  • Williams, S. C., A. J. DeNicola, T. Almendinger, and J. Maddock. 2013. Evaluation of traditional hunting as an overabundant deer management technique in suburban landscapes. Wildlife Society Bulletin 37:137-145.
  • Ward, J. S. and S. C. Williams. 2011. Controlling an invasive shrub, Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC), using directed heating with propane torches. Natural Areas Journal 31:500-506.
  • Williams, S. C. and J. S. Ward. 2010. Effects of Japanese barberry (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) removal and resulting microclimatic changes on Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) abundances in Connecticut, USA. Environmental Entomology 39:1911-1921.
  • Magnarelli, L. A., S. C. Williams, and E. Fikrig. 2010. Seasonal prevalence of serum antibodies to whole cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in white-tailed deer in Connecticut. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 46:781-790.
  • Ward, J. S., S. C. Williams, and T. E. Worthley. 2010. Effectiveness of two-stage control strategies for Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) varies by initial clump size. Invasive Plant Science and Management 3:60-69.
  • Ward, J. S. and S. C. Williams. 2010. Effectiveness of deer repellents in Connecticut. Human- Wildlife Interactions 4:56-66.
  • Williams, S. C., J. W. Ward, T. E. Worthley, and K. C. Stafford, III. 2009. Managing Japanese barberry (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) infestations reduces blacklegged tick (Acari: Ixodidae) abundance and infection prevalence with Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae.) Environmental Entomology 38:977-984.
  • Ward, J. S., T. E. Worthley, and S. C. Williams. 2009. Controlling Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC) in southern New England. Forest Ecology and Management 257:561-566.
  • Williams, S. C., A. J. DeNicola, and I. M. Ortega. 2008. Behavioral responses of white-tailed deer subjected to lethal management. Canadian Journal of Zoology 86:1358-1366.
  • DeNicola, A. J. and S. C. Williams. 2008. Sharpshooting suburban white-tailed deer reduces deer-vehicle collisions. Human-Wildlife Conflicts 2:28-33.
  • Williams, S. C., J. S. Ward, and U. Ramakrishnan. 2008. Endozoochory by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) across a suburban/woodland interface. Forest Ecology and Management 255:940-947.
  • Williams, S. C. and J. S. Ward. 2006. Exotic seed dispersal by white-tailed deer in southern Connecticut. Natural Areas Journal 26:383-39.
  • Williams, S. C. and A. J. DeNicola. 2002. Home range increase of lactating female white-taileddeer following herd reduction. Northeast Wildlife 57:29-38.
Department of Natural Resources and the Environment
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
University of Connecticut
1376 Storrs Road, Unit 4087
Storrs, Connecticut 06269-4087
Phone: 860-486-2840